Walk In Door Less Tiled Shower: Before & After Photos – With Design Ideas for No-door Shower

BEFORE-Old shower stall
AFTER-New shower

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is easier than you think to build this walk in door less tiled shower using any type of tile or stone you like. Additionally, add or omit features to make it fit your own style – how great is that?

Please DO NOT forget to READ OUR “Should Have Done”  list at the end of this article for helpful tips.

You can build a shower similar to this one using any tile you like and by adding or omitting certain features. In other words, GET CREATIVE!  We installed two rows of glass tiles that come in strips (see horizontal additions) but you can use stones or other unique tiles to create a diamond shape, include crushed glass tiles, or mix it up with patterned tile.  Shop around A LOT and look at tile.  You will know immediately what you do and do not like.

THE LEAK

A large, unexpected water puddle inside the garage of our home, built in 1992, was the impetus for an impromptu bathroom remodel.

A plumber declared that a leaky pipe was to blame for the standing water in the garage. To locate the leak, he brought in a “leak-detection guy” who used sound-detecting devices to find the leak. Cost:  $200.

The leak was between walls, one wall faced the interior of the garage and the other wall faced the master bath. Unfortunately, the leaky pipe was pin-pointed as being behind the wall where a roman tub resided. Upon finding the leaky pipe, it was apparent that IN 1992, when the house was built, a worker shot a nail from a nail gun into the pipe while framing around the tub. Shifting of the soil over time was the culprit that led to inevitable leak.

Roman tub dismantled to expose water pipe with a hole in it

THE TUB

The large Roman tub had to be removed in order to gain access to the leaky water pipe. Yes, the kind of free-standing tub that is built-in with cultured marble.  The plumber turned off the water source and bashed in the trim around the tub, also removing the ledges that circled around the perimeter of the tub. How many times had I bathed my children when they were little  in that tub, I wondered, as the tub was left standing, freed from it’s  trim.

DECIDING TO LOSE THE TUB

We took a daring leap and got rid of the tub altogether – planning to make a walk in door less tiled shower  similar to one used in a condo on vacation. We knew this could possibly turn-off future buyers of the home but were hoping that the new shower would be so stupendous that it would over ride the non-tub situation. Also, there is a tub upstairs.

GOOD-BYE, OLD SHOWER

The original master bath shower stall was not pretty. Mold kept returning along the caulk line between the pan and where the tile wall met –  caused by poor-quality board behind the tile. The floor of the original 37×43 glass-enclosed shower stall was always grey from contact with feet, AND the gold trim and glass enclosure were quite outdated. It had to go!

Here is how we did it with the help of a “tile guy”: Total cost, including labor and materials: $2,200


Down to the beams – Folded blue step ladder is propped where shower handle will be

1. JACK HAMMER

The plumber used a jack hammer to reach through the cement slab and capped off the water line to the tub.

2. HAUL-IT-AWAY

We placed an ad on Craig’s List giving away the roman tub and two nice (and strong!) ladies came and took it away. The plumber was asking $500 to do that for us.

3. SKETCHED SOME PLANS

We saw a photograph of a small shower that we like on the internet and adjusted it to suit our needs. Our final shower is 68-in. by 59-in. with one wall that is staggered into 3 steps. The tallest step is 85-in. long, the middle step is 69-in. with the lowest wall portion being 62-in. long. The shorter wall to the left is staggered with just one step.

Hardi board frames a step-pattern – - creating visual interest on a large wall. Notice just one ceiling light (for now).

4. TOOK OUT THE SHOWER

Glass walls, shower pan, wall tile all taken down and trashed. All wall board removed down to the vertical beams. A new, and much larger, shower pan was installed.

Moved water lines to the left so new shower handle would be centered

5. RE-ROUTED PLUMBING

Moved the drain hole over to the left about 10 inches so that it would be centered in the new shower. Swung the copper faucet water pipes over as well so that the new shower handle would be centered.  Our tile guy rerouted and added more copper pipe; he then used a small propane torch to weld pipe pieces together.

Notice 6×6 decorative tile at chest-height

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6. FRAMED AND TILED

  • After the shower was framed out, and Hardi back board was installed, 16 x 16-in. tile from Home Depot was used.
  • 6 x 6-in. decorative tile added at chest-height trim inside the shower.

Adding a corner seat
  • 2 x 2-in. decorative tile was used on the outside in two strips that circumvented the outer walls.
  • 2 x 2-in. sheets of tile were laid on the floor.
  • A corner seat was added inside the shower and tile was added to it.
    Created floor design with 12×12 tiles in area outside the shower entry – the tan tile is what covers floor in the rest of the master bath

     

    6×6 decorative tile used inside shower. See two (difficult to view)  niches on left wall.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Look carefully to see a soap holder installed using 2 pieces of angled tile. See the new rain can shower head and lever.

     

    A second recessed light had to be added to make light fixtures look balanced.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


    Should have:

  • 1.  SHOULD HAVE LOCATED THE SHOWER SEAT IN ONE OF THE CORNERS AGAINST THE WALL WHERE THE SHOWER HEAD IS INSTALLED. THE FINAL SEAT ESCAPES THE SPRAY OF WATER UNLESS WE ADD A HOSE EXTENSION TO THE SHOWER HEAD. Duh.

  • 2. WENT TO GREAT PAINS TO INSURE THAT THE DOORWAY to the shower WAS NOT VISIBLE WHEN ENTERING THE MASTER BATH SO THAT WHOMEVER WAS IN THE SHOWER WOULD HAVE privacy. BUT, WE DID NOT TAKE INTO ACCOUNT THE LARGE MIRROR ON THE OPPOSITE WALL, WHICH REFLECTS THE PERSON STANDING IN THE SHOWER TO WHOMEVER ENTERS THE BATH AREA. Yikes AND Duh!!

  • 3. WOULD HAVE ADDED 2 SOAP SHELVES to the interior of the walk in door less tiled shower INSTEAD OF 1 … THEY’RE EASY TO INSTALL AND USEFUL FOR HOLDING OTHER THINGS SUCH AS RAZORS.


    4.  MIGHT HAVE ADDED A THIRD RECESSED AREA FOR SHAMPOO BOTTLES…DEPENDS ON HOW MANY PEOPLE USE THE SHOWER.

  • 5.  Brushed stainless finish on lever/handle in shower shows hard water spots – - but who can win with that??
  • SURPRISES:

  • 1. SURPRISINGLY, THE SPRAY GOING OUTSIDE THE DOOR-LESS ENTRY IS MILD, if ANY OCCURS AT ALL. WE BELIEVE THAT IS DUE TO THE new rain can style SHOWER-HEAD WE CHOSE. RAIN CAN SHOWER HEADS  SPRAY STRAIGHT DOWN…but IT WAS HARD TO GET USED TO THE FEELING OF THE SPRAY NOT COMING AT YOU FROM AN ANGLE. DID GET USED TO IT AFTER AWHILE, HOWEVER.

  • 2. IT CAN BE A LITTLE CHILLY IN SUCH A LARGE SHOWER IN THE WINTER…BUT WE ALSO GOT USED TO THAT.


    3. PLUMBERS MAKE A LOT OF MONEY.  


    4. SUPER EASY TO KEEP CLEAN! Hooray!

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